Tagged: Bob Dylan

The answer is blowin’ in the wind


The gospel last Sunday was the story of Nicodemus visiting Jesus at night in order to ask some questions. Here’s what I said.

Genesis 12.1-4a; Romans 4.1-5, 13-17; John 3.1-17

Questions. Today’s gospel is about questions. Or rather, it’s about someone seeking answers but not really knowing the right questions to ask.

Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers. So said the great French philosopher Voltaire.

But how do we know what the right questions are? Some of history’s greatest thinkers have pondered: What are the questions we should be asking? And they’ve come up with some interesting answers to that question. They’ve come up with questions like these – posed by in my opinion probably the greatest ever winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature:

How many roads must a man walk down before you call him a man?
Or how many seas must a white dove sail before she sleeps in the sand?
Or how many times must the cannon balls fly before they’re forever banned?

What are the answers to those questions? Well, some of you will have recognized those words, so you will know: Continue reading

What I said for Corpus Christi


The Thursday following Trinity Sunday is kept as the feast of Corpus Christi in the Anglican Church. This year we kept it on the following Sunday. Here’s what I said.

1 Corinthians 11.23-26; John 6.51-58

By 1965 Bob Dylan was recognized as one of the leaders of the folk music revival in America. Songs like The Times They Are a-Changin’ led to him being called “The spokesman of a generation”. And then he went and did something that alienated many of his fans. On July 25th 1965, appearing at the Newport Folk Festival, a bastion of traditional and authentic folk music. Sandwiched between two traditional performers, he made the spontaneous decision to appear not with his usual acoustic guitar but with an electric guitar and backed by a fully amplified band. There is film footage of his performance. Within a few bars of his first song you can hear the cheers – and you can also hear the booing. Continue reading

What I said on Sunday – Lent 2


The gospel reading for Sunday in the Church of England was the visit by Nicodemus to Jesus. Here’s what I said.

Genesis 12.1-4; Romans 4.1-5, 13-17; John 3.1-17

People have always asked questions about the difficult things in life – questions for which there simply aren’t easy answers. Questions like:
How many roads must a man walk down before you call him a man?
Or how many seas must a white dove sail before she sleeps in the sand?
Or how many times must the cannon balls fly before they’re forever banned?

What are the answers to those questions? Continue reading